composite decking get hot direct sunlight

  • So, if you are building a deck that will be in direct sunlight, look for lighter color decking options and less dense products, such as 's Legacy or Terrain Sandy Birch decking material. Of course, planting trees or constructing an awning or pergola can also minimize direct sun exposure, dramatically reducing heat build-up. But with any outdoor surface in direct sunlight, shoes should be worn on hot days to reduce the risk of burning your feet. Share:& ...


  • Not only do composite materials get hot, but they retain a significant portion of that heat for hours after the sun goes down. Over time, heat breaks down the core plastic materials in the composite planks. This breakdown can result in sagging or warping, leaching chemicals, or deck board swelling that will result in an uneven walking surface. So what does this all mean in the big picture? The plastic-based boardwalk material in direct sunlight will be heavily impacted by& ...


  • hot Feet. All decking products can get hot underfoot with a direct overhead sun exposure, but plastic and composite decking have a reputation for getting uncomfortably hot in warm, sunny climates. In general the darker the color and the denser the material, the hotter the material will get in full sunshine. If that's a concern, a simple comparison of competing products laid out in the sun is the best way to go. The same goes for dark wood decking when the original dark color is maintained& ...


  • The deck is 400 sq. f. I am looking for a mid-range price budget-wise. Something that looks natural, don't like a dark wood. The house has grey aluminum siding. the deck gets lots of sun during the day. What wood would you recommend? I am also considering composite, Timbertech most likely. But don't like that it gets hot under the sun. Though some people say that any materials would get, including wood. Advice please. Email. SaveComment14Like. Comments (14).


  • In other words, you can walk across many wood surfaces that have been in direct sunlight for hours without burning your bare feet. ... These light colored materials readily reflect sunlight and can get quite hot. ... Do you really get a payback? Finally, don't ever believe you save money right out of the box when you buy a more expensive product. I have seen literature for these composite decking materials that say they save you money. You never save any money until such future time& ...


  • composites heat up. Dark, solid composites absorb more heat than lighter types. Dark-colored and very dense composites can really heat up in the sun. If you're sitting in a deck chair on top of all that plastic, the heat reflected up to you can make you sizzle like the burger on your grill. get composite samples in different colors and set them outside on your deck site. If they're hot enough to fry an egg after a day in the hot sun, consider a lighter color or a different composite material.


  • Unlike wood decking, which requires regular painting, staining and sanding, decking requires little upkeep and is resistant to rotting, warping and splintering. Company, Inc. is a member of ...


  • Zuri decking by Royal heats up in the sun like any hardwood or low-maintenance decking, but cools off much quicker than other composite decks.


  • The sun is king. It makes deck temperatures 34º to 76º hotter than ambient air. When passing clouds hide the sun for several minutes, deck temperatures drop 6º to 8º on most decking, and as much as 24º on one deck board. ... 's all composite boards, which have no plastic cap? Perhaps it's the materials: DuraLife uses polypropylene plastic for its cap and in its core. The other manufacturers use polyethylene or PVC, both of which conduct more heat. hot.


  • With summer around the corner and deck season beginning, customers often ask us, “how much hotter is composite decking than treated wood?” We also get asked, “if I go with a darker wood stain, will it be a lot hotter on the deck?” These are all very good questions. The more pigment that's in the stain, the more protected from the UV rays the deck will be. But how much hotter is that darker color? And how much hotter is PVC decking versus hardwood or treated& ...


  • get the pros and cons of wood, plastic, composite and more decking materials, plus a basic price comparison. ... If your deck is in the sun or in the shade for the majority of the day — particularly in summer, when it will be used most — you'll want to choose the material that will be comfortable in that spot on the hottest days of the year. Of course, size, cost, style and ... "composites and plastics can get so hot, you can't walk on them barefoot," Rossi says. Capped& ...


  • I think it's a or Lowe's "store brand" of -type stuff in a nice silvery gray color. 2. We pressure wash it once a year. We've never used any cleaner on it. 3. What we liked was no splinters, no ruts, no wearing away of wood. Ours has been in place for more than 6 years and it looks great. 4. It gets hotter in the sun than a wooden deck will - that's the only thing I can think of that you didn't mention. Like, if it's in direct hot sun for a couple hours, you'll really not& ...


  • Your decking surface gets hotter in the sun based on the amount of solar or heat energy it absorbs versus how much it reflects. The darker the surface ... For example, wood surfaces pull heat deep into the board; this makes the surface cooler but causes the board to stay warm longer once the sun is gone. To help you decide, ... direct sunlight. Compared to Hardwood and composite decking, it's generally a more affordable option but it still packs in plenty of features.


  • In full sun, middle of summer situations too hot for bare feet.


  • A common question that comes up is whether or not composite gets too hot in the summer to walk barefoot on. I have come across many customers who told me other contractors told them that it gets too hot, these are usually contractors who prefer a different type of decking of course. So I went ahead and did some research myself to settle the issue and was quite surprised at the results. This research was done at 1:00p.m. in NW Portland, Oregon on 7-21-16 on a full sun day with no& ...